Tag Archives: lacrosse gear

Are Your Goggles Legal for the upcoming 2017-18 Season?

Field Hockey and Lacrosse Goggles

Rule changes regarding equipment are constantly fluctuating and the latest shift concerns goggles. As many of you know, goggles are a key piece of equipment that high school and middle school women’s field hockey and women’s lacrosse players are required to wear.

In order for wire goggles to be legal for women’s field hockey, they must have a wire bar that stretches vertically through the goggle. The comparison between women’s field hockey and women’s lacrosse goggles can be found below.

lacrosse goggles vs field hockey goggles

Notice that there is no veritcal bar running through the player’s vision in the lacrosse goggle. The reasoning behind the need for the vertical bar in field hockey is to prevent the toe of a stick from getting in the goggle. In lacrosse, this is not an issue, therefore they do not require the vertical wire piece.

Keep this rule of thumb in mind, you CAN wear your women’s field hockey goggles for lacrosse, but CANNOT wear your women’s lacrosse goggles for field hockey. So if you are a duel-sport athlete and want to invest in only one pair of goggles, your best bet would be to purchase women’s field hockey goggles.

Many players prefer Bangerz goggles. There are two styles of Bangerz goggles that can be used for both women’s lacrosse and women’s field hockey. These are the Bangerz Elite Goggle and the Bangerz Sleek Fitting Youth Eyeguard. Unfortunately, the Bangerz Sunglasses Eye Protection is no longer legal for women’s field hockey. However, they are legal for women’s lacrosse.

If you’re wondering are your current field hockey goggles are legal, or you are just in search of a new pair, feel free to contact Longstreth Sporting Good’s Retail Store or Customer Service with any questions you may have. Visit our Ask the Experts page to forward us any of your sports related questions. We are here to help!

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How to Keep your Women’s Lacrosse Stick Looking New

how to guide to womens lacrosse sticksIt’s important that players know how to best take care of their women’s lacrosse stick, as well as the best places to practice. These are just a couple of tips for keeping your lacrosse stick looking like new.

You may not think that the temperature affects your women’s lacrosse stick, but it does, DRASTICALLY! Your women’s lacrosse head is made of plastic and could warp if you leave it in the heat for too long. It’s best to keep your lacrosse stick inside your house, where the temperature will remain consistent. Storing it in a car or garage – especially in the summer time – could be too hot. It’s important to keep in mind that warped women’s lacrosse heads are not covered under warranty, so storing it in a moderate temperature is a crucial tip.

It’s really hard to avoid playing in the rain, but water can damage the stringing of your women’s lacrosse stick over time. So if you want to go outside and practice in the rain, try practicing with a back-up women’s lacrosse stick.

Another great way to keep your stick longer is to practice on a grass or turf surface. Although it may be convenient to practice in your driveway, the hard pavement could damage your women’s lacrosse head and stringing when picking up ground balls. Practicing your lacrosse skills on grass or turf will prevent the lacrosse head from becoming scratched and the strings from being frayed or torn.

There are a few good habits you’ll want to start that will help, too. Treat your women’s lacrosse stick with care by never leaning on or throwing it. Avoid using your women’s lacrosse stick as a cane to prevent warping the head. By leaning on your lacrosse stick, you are bending your head and causing more harm than good. Keep your stick safe by never throwing it to the ground. Even if you’re frustrated by a bad call or a really bad practice, it’s not worth cracking the head or damaging the lacrosse shaft.

Caring for your women’s lacrosse stick is really important and can save you a lot of money in the future. Warranties do not cover self-inflicted problems like warped heads and damaged strings. To avoid the hassle of finding a new women’s lacrosse stick, simply follow the tips listed above to keep your current stick as new as possible.

If you have any lacrosse related questions regarding your stick, visit Longstreth Sporting Goods’ Ask the Experts page. Longstreth’s sports managers are always helpful with answering questions and giving suggestions. Longstreth Sporting Goods is your one-stop shop for all your women’s lacrosse needs.

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My Daughter is Starting Lacrosse – What Equipment Does She Need?

equipment

Congratulations!  Your daughter is going to play an intense and exciting game which will challenge her to develop physical stamina, hand-eye coordination and the ability to work with her team. Here is what she is going to need to play well and keep safe:

Lacrosse Stick

Of course, the most important and personal piece of equipment for each player is her stick which has two parts: the handle, and the head. Both pieces come in a wide variety of sizes and shapes that give young women different advantages depending on the position they play and how they like to handle the ball.  However, without knowing all the ins-and-outs of the game, how is a beginning player supposed to choose? Here are some guidelines:

  • Heads with flat scoops and wide faces help beginners catch and pick up the ball.
  • Stick head choice can depend on position: narrow throat for offensive player wanting increased accuracy; stiff, flat head for defenders for hard checks and stability on groundballs; sturdy head for goalies to withstand hard shots.
  • Stick length can be between 35.5 and 43.25, but beginners often opt for a shorter stick for better control.
  • Handle material advantages differ: alloy is strongest in moderate weather, composite is softer and more flexible in extreme weather; titanium is lightest and strongest but can make a stick top-heavy.

ASTM Approved Lacrosse Goggles

Safety is first and wearing goggles that meet the current ASTM International standards is a must to protect your daughter’s eyes. Lacrosse goggles:

  • Are made with soft padding, rubber, plastic, and wire.
  • Should fit snugly on the face, be comfortable and provide good side and ground vision.
  • Can be made for girls who wear glasses.
  • Should be tried on before buying.

Mouth Guard

Available in a variety of fun colors, shapes, and flavors, lacrosse mouth guards protect teeth but are lightweight and comfortable.  In addition:

  • Girls like to show their style with their mouth guard colors.
  • Mouth guards allow girls to breathe, talk, and even drink.
  • You can buy them for girls who have braces.
  • Flavors include: bubble gum, mint, fruit, and lemon-lime
  • Mouth guard cases are a good way to store them.

Lacrosse Cleats

The right lacrosse footwear will help players have good traction on grass, mud, or turf. The cleats are usually designed with 4 studs on the heel and 6-8 on the front.  Choose cleats that are:

  • Lightweight and breathable for flexibility and comfort.
  • Stiff enough to absorb impact and protect from foot fatigue and injury.
  • Not too tight or too loose, with about 1/2 inch of space between toe and shoe.

Optional Lacrosse Equipment

For protection or cold weather comfort, some players like to wear gloves.  In addition, players often want to have their own balls for individual practice. One inexpensive but important piece of lacrosse gearfor beginners is the Cradlebaby, a lacrosse training ball attached to an lanyard-type band which allows players to practice stick work, cradling, and improve wrist strength.

Worthwhile Investment

Yes, buying your daughter lacrosse equipment will be an investment, but the total cost will probably be less than private lessons in many sports. Better yet, you will get the enjoyment of watching her grow in confidence, agility, and pride in her sport and her team.

Lacrosse Equipment 101

lacrosse-equipment-101

There is always room for more hustle in female lacrosse. Having the right equipment can make that extra effort more profitable. Here is a short course in Lacrosse Equipment 101:

Stick

Which is the best lacrosse stick?  In truth, there is not just one good choice. Choice also depends on:

  • Experience in playing.
  • The level of skill.
  • Age and height.

Handles

When choosing a handle, the most important thing to consider is how well that handle feels to the player. Here are some questions to ask:

  • Does this handle feel comfortable in the player’s hands?
  • Does the player feel she has good control while catching and cradling?

A wide variety of materials are used in constructing handles and each material has advantages:

  • Scandium/Titanium: Very light weight and very strong material but this can make the stick feel top heavy.
  • Composite: Not as strong but are more flexible and have a softer feel. This material can be better if the player often faces extremes of temperature.
  • Alloy: Strong but less temperate in more extreme weather conditions.

Other considerations in choosing a stick are:

  • Diameter: Choose between the 7/8″ traditional for women, a mid-size (between 7/8″ and 1″) or men’s 1″.
  • Shape: Many choices including octagon, concave octagon, rounded octagon, teardrop, and tapered.
  • Finish: alloy, mild-sandblast, soft feel and smooth rubberized.

Heads

The kind of Lacrosse Stick Heads players choose is often based on position:

  • Offensive players need a narrow throat to help minimize ball control.
  • Defensive players usually prefer a stiffer, flatter head to hold up against checks and on groundballs.
  • Goalies need a sturdy head.

Goggles

Because women’s lacrosse rules are designed for increased safety, female players are not required to have a lot of protective gear.  However, eye protection is crucial.  In choosing goggles, look for:

  • Tight  but comfortable fit around the face.
  • Clear vision all around so that player can make clear passes, maneuver around opponents, and see groundballs easily.
  • Strong and protective for eyes.

Upgraded titanium cage goggles are lighter weight but still very strong and are able to prevent injury.

Gloves

Young female lacrosse players do not have to wear gloves but may want to have a pair. Gloves are typically worn when a player:

  • Wants to keep her hands warm in winter playing conditions.
  • Prefers to protect her hands from injury.
  • Likes the increased grip that gloves provide.

Especially when a player is just starting out, having the right lacrosse stick, goggles, gloves and can make the difference in whether they feel confident in play. That is why Longstreth specializes in helping young female lacrosse players choose the best equipment, uniforms and footwear for their individual playing needs.