Category Archives: Field Hockey equipment

Are Your Goggles Legal for the upcoming 2017-18 Season?

Field Hockey and Lacrosse Goggles

Rule changes regarding equipment are constantly fluctuating and the latest shift concerns goggles. As many of you know, goggles are a key piece of equipment that high school and middle school women’s field hockey and women’s lacrosse players are required to wear.

In order for wire goggles to be legal for women’s field hockey, they must have a wire bar that stretches vertically through the goggle. The comparison between women’s field hockey and women’s lacrosse goggles can be found below.

lacrosse goggles vs field hockey goggles

Notice that there is no veritcal bar running through the player’s vision in the lacrosse goggle. The reasoning behind the need for the vertical bar in field hockey is to prevent the toe of a stick from getting in the goggle. In lacrosse, this is not an issue, therefore they do not require the vertical wire piece.

Keep this rule of thumb in mind, you CAN wear your women’s field hockey goggles for lacrosse, but CANNOT wear your women’s lacrosse goggles for field hockey. So if you are a duel-sport athlete and want to invest in only one pair of goggles, your best bet would be to purchase women’s field hockey goggles.

Many players prefer Bangerz goggles. There are two styles of Bangerz goggles that can be used for both women’s lacrosse and women’s field hockey. These are the Bangerz Elite Goggle and the Bangerz Sleek Fitting Youth Eyeguard. Unfortunately, the Bangerz Sunglasses Eye Protection is no longer legal for women’s field hockey. However, they are legal for women’s lacrosse.

If you’re wondering are your current field hockey goggles are legal, or you are just in search of a new pair, feel free to contact Longstreth Sporting Good’s Retail Store or Customer Service with any questions you may have. Visit our Ask the Experts page to forward us any of your sports related questions. We are here to help!

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Introducing Nedstar [video]


Introducing Nedstar a Lonstreth exclusive field hockey brand!

Video Transcript: Hi, I’m Maggie and today we’ll be talking about Nedstar.

Longstreth is proud to add Nedstar Field Hockey to our exclusive line of products. Nedstar sticks represent quality and innovation. They transfer their love of the game into high-quality sticks. The colorful, well-designed sticks offer a variety of composition and bow types. These sticks are perfect for the advanced and elite players.

To become a part of the Never Ending Dream, stop by our retail store to try your new NedStar stick, today!

Nedstar Field Hockey Sticks:
All Field Hockey Sticks:

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Nedstar Field Hockey Sticks – New to the Longstreth Line

Nedstar Field Hockey Sticks

Nedstar is an Irish field hockey company that has been on the market for only a few years. Their passion and energy match Longstreth’s commitment to the game – making Nedstar a good fit for Longstreth’s exclusive line of field hockey sticks.

Nedstar creates field hockey sticks of the highest design and innovation. They represent quality, affordability, and colorfulness. USA Women’s National Team player, Katelyn Falgowski Ginolfi plays with the Nedstar Superfly. This powerhouse stick is light to the touch, with a late bow and solid composition for the elite player.

Longstreth is the exclusive U.S. dealer for the Nedstar field hockey sticks. Check out the Nedstar Dream Limited Edition, a drag flicking specialist stick which also caters to dynamic ball movement all over the field.  The Nedstar Superfly is a popular choice for the dynamic player who requires quick ball handling as well as maximum power. The Nedstar Groove G2 is a powerful stick with a grooved channel, which allows effortless transition between the ball on the turf and aerial skills. The line is rounded out with the Nedstar Low Bow 2 which has the versatility to balance power and skill.

Visit to view each stick’s composition, bow, and target weight. If you have any field hockey questions, ask our field hockey experts – they’re always here to help you select the perfect field hockey stick.

Longstreth – The Place to Find all that You need for Field Hockey


Female athletes deserve equipment designed especially for them. Longstreth Sporting Goods specializes in field hockey, softball and lacrosse equipment designed for the female athlete so that the players are properly fitted with what they need to do their best, starting from their very first stick all the way to the latest technologies.

While field hockey is unfamiliar sport to some, in fact, it is one of the world’s oldest team sports. Played like ice hockey except outside on turf, or inside on a hard surface, field hockey has two teams of eleven players each (ten fielders and one goalie). The players use the flat side of the field hockey stick to move a ball (rather than a puck) down the field and score points by getting it into the goal.

Field Hockey Equipment 

Here is a run down of the basic equipment your player needs to kick start their field hockey fun!

Field Hockey Sticks

Required for each player is a hockey stick. These range in price from a basic stick, that can be as inexpensive as $25, to a high-tech model which can cost over $400.  Advanced players use high-tech sticks in order to maximize their control, speed, and ball-handling abilities. However, basic sticks are good for beginners as they:

  • Learn the basic rules and techniques of the game.
  • Develop ball control.
  • Learn stick skills.

Field Hockey Balls

Of course, you also need to have a field hockey ball in order to play the game. Most teams have balls for practice and play, but you might want some for practicing on your own so that you can improve your ball handling skills. They are not expensive, typically costing between $5-10 dollars. Truthfully, there is not as much difference between the balls as there is between the sticks. Here are the basics:

  • While field hockey balls are hard plastic, they are generally hollow inside.
  • High School balls must have an  NFHS approved stamp.
  • Division I colleges are required to use a Kookaurra ball that has a cork core for a soft touch and a dimpled surface that rolls better on the wet turf.
  • Indoor balls are somewhat smaller and lighter.

Other Equipment

What else do you need?  Most of the additional field hockey equipment is designed for protection.  You will want to get:

  • Shinguards: these are required and generally made from hard plastic. They cover from your ankle bones to just below your kneecap.
  • Mouth Guard: required to protect your teeth and mouth from being hit by the ball or a stick.
  • Goggles: required for middle and high school players. Whether made of wire or plastic, these must meet the current ASTM F2713 guidelines for field hockey.
  • Gloves: wearing these is optional but many outside players wear one on their left hand for protection from hurting their knuckles on the turf or ball. Some players, especially indoor, wear them on both hands.

Getting the Best for Female Hockey Players

Excited about this up-and-coming sport? Whether you are choosing your first field hockey stick, ready to upgrade to one which includes all of the latest technologies or need to outfit yourself with the other equipment for the game, Longstreth aims to be your one-stop-shop for all field hockey gear.

Is it Time to Replace your Field Hockey Ball?

It is always a good idea to have a number of field hockey balls around; both practice balls and regulation game balls. Even if this essential piece of field hockey equipment takes a long time to break down, there still does come a time when the ball should be replaced with a new one.

The hockey balls that you use on game day have to undergo a strict series of testing to make sure that they play evenly on a number of surfaces, and that they conform to a bounce test, among other standards. They must also be a specific size and weight. So, if you notice while playing that the game ball is marked, dented, or otherwise damaged, you should request that the umpire change the ball. A damaged ball could affect the game’s play, and put you and your team at a disadvantage.

For the practice balls that you use, they will generally be hollow, and are often plastic, making them susceptible to breaking and cracking over time. In a study published in 2008 in The Engineering of Sport, various tests showed that at low speeds, the greatest impact on field hockey balls is to the plastic covering. As the ball is hit harder and faster, the materials that make up the ball have a big impact on if it will deform or break. Since practice balls usually have a hollow core, this makes them more likely to break down over time when compared with the field hockey balls that you use on game day. This is also one reason why practice balls have a lower price.

So when should you replace the ball? Just like on game day, if you see that a ball is dented or cracked, remove it from your practice collection. It could split or crack further, and create a dangerous situation where pieces of the ball come flying off. Without eye protection, there is the possibility of injury due to this type of damage, so play it safe and grab a new ball from a place that sell a wide variety of Field Hockey Equipment –

Remember to keep in mind that the temperature also affects the durability of field hockey balls. Cold weather play makes the plastic of a practice ball and the polyurethane cover on game day balls more brittle and likely to crack or break. You want to have the peace of mind to know that when you deliver your strongest drive, the ball you are using will not break apart. Take a little extra time to inspect the ball when the temperature is below 60 degrees.

When it is time to replace a lost or broken ball, you can rely on Longstreth Sporting Goods to have the type of ball you want, from a brand that you trust. That goes for all field hockey equipment, from the store that focuses on your specific needs as a female athlete including the best and the most durable Field Hockey Sticks!

Comparison between Different Types of Field Hockey Balls

field hocky balls

There are many different types of field hockey balls available for all of your practice and game day needs. Which ones you choose depend upon a number of factors, including league regulations, playing surface, and field conditions. You will be spending a lot of different time using each type of ball, so here is a guide to help you choose the right one for your next practice session or game day.

Practice Balls

Field hockey balls for practice are made from plastic and are hollow inside. They can often be purchased for less than official game balls. Because they don’t have to meet exact standards for game play, they can be made in more vibrant and fun colors to make your practice time a bit more exciting. Even though they aren’t certified for play, they are usually about the same weight and size as the ball you will use on game day.

Practice balls can be used on a number of different surfaces, and are generally smooth. The smoothness can be an added challenge, because on a wet outdoor surface, it may not roll uniformly or predictably, giving you the advantage of being more quick to adapt to changing conditions.

Game Balls

On game day, you want a standard ball of a predictable size and weight. You can rely on an official certification process to make sure that each and every ball conforms to standards of national or international play. Depending upon the league and level of play, there still can be some differences in ball size and weight.

For high school play, any ball used in play must have an official NFHS stamp to certify its size and weight. The ball is hollow inside and smooth on the outside. On game day, the umpire may choose a white or orange ball or another solid color depending upon lighting and field conditions. Whichever color is more likely to help the players and umpire see the ball most clearly is chosen.

Indoor field hockey is played on a smaller playing surface, and the ball is also generally smaller and lighter than the ball used for outdoor play. It is also hollow and smooth, making it best suited to indoor play.

The standard ball for elite level play is the Kookaburra ball. Its funny name comes from being a product of Australia, and over time it has become known by the nickname “kooks.” The ball has dimples on its surface, which helps it to roll true and predictably on wet surfaces. This makes it perfect for most natural turf conditions that you will play on during outdoor play. Another advantage of this ball is that it has a molded rubber and cork core, giving it a very soft touch for improved play.

Regardless of the conditions that you play and practice in, you need to be prepared to adapt your game and perform at your best. Having a selection of practice and official game balls available to you gives you this ability to adapt. You also need to make sure that the stick you choose is right for your game. No matter what your needs, visit Longstreth for field hockey equipment that you need to enjoy the game and play at your best.

Buying Field Hockey Equipment – Tips for Beginners


Field hockey is a fast-paced sport that provides great exercise, life lessons and team building for young athletes. Beginners’ field hockey equipment requirements do not have to bust the family budget, either, if parents keep in mind the difference between must-haves, should-haves and nice-to-haves.

Must-Have Field Hockey Equipment

For both boys and girls beginning in field hockey, every athlete must have three essential pieces of field hockey equipment: the hockey stick, mouthguard, and shinguards.

For what some parents may dismiss as a simple piece of wood, the stick has many variations:

  • Indoor sticks
  • Goalie sticks
  • Composite sticks
  • Wood sticks
  • Hook, maxi, midi and shorti heads

Starting out, players may not know what advantage a particular head shape has, so encourage your beginning athlete to keep her ears open, ask questions, and take the advice of more experienced players she trusts. Stick length is often more crucial for beginning players than the head shape. Height charts can help, but a player gets to feel comfortable with a specific length of field hockey stick, so you may not want to invest in a high-end stick as the first purchase.

The mouthguard is a requirement for player protection. Mouthguards and mouthguard cases are available in many styles. Common these days are mouthguards for wearers of braces, flavored mouthguards, and bulk-purchased disposable mouthguards to minimize germs.

Shinguards are the only other piece of required equipment in most regions. Protect your child and keep her enthusiasm for the game by preventing painful injuries to the shin bones. Just as with the mouthguard, this is not a place to skimp, since the shinguard may be the difference between a little discomfort during an intense game and sitting out the season with a broken shin.

Should-Have Field Hockey Equipment

Goggles are an optional piece of equipment that could save your child’s sight in the event of a bad encounter with an opponent’s stick. In addition to goggles, nose guards and full face masks are available, often in a selection of colors. Have your budding field hockey star try the goggles or masks on for a snug but comfortable fit, and to test forward and peripheral vision.

Remember not to over-equip your athlete with safety precautions that themselves pose a threat to other players. Some regulations in some regions permit only smooth face masks or tight-fitting plastic goggles, for example, to prevent the wire of a framed goggle or mask from injuring others.

Nice-to-Have Field Hockey Equipment

Two items are good for your new player to have, for increased field control and for comfort:

  • Turf shoes or cleats
  • Shin guard socks or rash guards

Turf shoes or molded cleats give your child a firm grip on the field, allowing for quick turns, stops and starts.
Shin guard socks are oversized, tall socks worn under the shin guards to prevent chaffing. Rash guards prevent shin guard rash from developing. Shin guard rash may be an allergic reaction to the material in shin guards, or it may be a natural result of heat, sweat and the friction your child’s skin encounters during an exciting field hockey game. The simple remedy is to prevent the opportunity for a shin guard to rub, by having your child wear rash guards.

For parents new to the game, Longstreth is here to help. Contact us today for answers to your questions regarding the right field hockey equipment or the right kind of balls to purchase to support your son or daughter in his or her dreams of field hockey glory. After all, every great player was a beginner at one time.