Category Archives: Field Hockey Balls

What are Field Hockey Balls made up of?

Field hockey balls have gone through many changes over the years, but they are now standardized and reliably predictable due to a design that uses modern materials. Organizations at the local, national and international levels make sure that the balls you use when you play are made from the best material possible, so that you can focus on playing the game that you love.


Just like with a lot of field hockey player equipment, plastics and other modern materials have brought big improvements to field hockey balls. Before the 1980s, the balls were made with a leather exterior. This meant that the ball could swell in wet conditions, making it very spongy. This ruined the reaction of the ball when struck. If you’ve played in wet conditions, you know that the ball already slows on a wet field, so a wet leather ball made this even worse.

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The Kookaburra Ball

It was not until the 1980s that the leather-wrapped ball design was abandoned in favor of one with a plastic shell. This made the reaction of the ball when struck much more predictable, especially when combined with the patented Kookaburra design. This incorporates dimples on the shell of the ball, making it roll much better in both wet and dry conditions on real grass or fake turf.

Inside the Kookaburra ball is a cork core, which keeps in line with the old traditions of ball design while promoting a lighter weight. Other game balls, such as the TK Multi Turf or Gryphon Game Ball, are made of solid plastic, and these may or may not be dimpled. In almost all cases, the field hockey ball is white, although other colors such as orange or yellow can be used in game play. This can especially help in conditions where a white ball might be difficult to see.

Practice Balls

Practice balls can sometimes be made of hollow plastic, making them lighter weight than regulation game balls. This gives you the advantage of being able to purchase a large quantity of balls for practice at a lower cost, since there is not as much material used. You can also find a wider variety of colors to choose from in practice balls such as pink, blue, glitter, or rainbow balls from TK Hockey.

There is nothing quite as satisfying for a field hockey player as hearing the sound of field hockey sticks striking a ball up the field. Now you know that you are part of a long tradition of field hockey players taking to the field to enjoy the game that you love. Even if the design of the game ball has changed, many aspects of it stay the same. No matter what your needs are, Longstreth is the sporting goods store that specifically finds and provides the products that you need to enjoy your chosen sport. Click here to find the finest selection of field hockey sticks.


Is it Time to Replace your Field Hockey Ball?

It is always a good idea to have a number of field hockey balls around; both practice balls and regulation game balls. Even if this essential piece of field hockey equipment takes a long time to break down, there still does come a time when the ball should be replaced with a new one.

The hockey balls that you use on game day have to undergo a strict series of testing to make sure that they play evenly on a number of surfaces, and that they conform to a bounce test, among other standards. They must also be a specific size and weight. So, if you notice while playing that the game ball is marked, dented, or otherwise damaged, you should request that the umpire change the ball. A damaged ball could affect the game’s play, and put you and your team at a disadvantage.

For the practice balls that you use, they will generally be hollow, and are often plastic, making them susceptible to breaking and cracking over time. In a study published in 2008 in The Engineering of Sport, various tests showed that at low speeds, the greatest impact on field hockey balls is to the plastic covering. As the ball is hit harder and faster, the materials that make up the ball have a big impact on if it will deform or break. Since practice balls usually have a hollow core, this makes them more likely to break down over time when compared with the field hockey balls that you use on game day. This is also one reason why practice balls have a lower price.

So when should you replace the ball? Just like on game day, if you see that a ball is dented or cracked, remove it from your practice collection. It could split or crack further, and create a dangerous situation where pieces of the ball come flying off. Without eye protection, there is the possibility of injury due to this type of damage, so play it safe and grab a new ball from a place that sell a wide variety of Field Hockey Equipment –

Remember to keep in mind that the temperature also affects the durability of field hockey balls. Cold weather play makes the plastic of a practice ball and the polyurethane cover on game day balls more brittle and likely to crack or break. You want to have the peace of mind to know that when you deliver your strongest drive, the ball you are using will not break apart. Take a little extra time to inspect the ball when the temperature is below 60 degrees.

When it is time to replace a lost or broken ball, you can rely on Longstreth Sporting Goods to have the type of ball you want, from a brand that you trust. That goes for all field hockey equipment, from the store that focuses on your specific needs as a female athlete including the best and the most durable Field Hockey Sticks!

Comparison between Different Types of Field Hockey Balls

field hocky balls

There are many different types of field hockey balls available for all of your practice and game day needs. Which ones you choose depend upon a number of factors, including league regulations, playing surface, and field conditions. You will be spending a lot of different time using each type of ball, so here is a guide to help you choose the right one for your next practice session or game day.

Practice Balls

Field hockey balls for practice are made from plastic and are hollow inside. They can often be purchased for less than official game balls. Because they don’t have to meet exact standards for game play, they can be made in more vibrant and fun colors to make your practice time a bit more exciting. Even though they aren’t certified for play, they are usually about the same weight and size as the ball you will use on game day.

Practice balls can be used on a number of different surfaces, and are generally smooth. The smoothness can be an added challenge, because on a wet outdoor surface, it may not roll uniformly or predictably, giving you the advantage of being more quick to adapt to changing conditions.

Game Balls

On game day, you want a standard ball of a predictable size and weight. You can rely on an official certification process to make sure that each and every ball conforms to standards of national or international play. Depending upon the league and level of play, there still can be some differences in ball size and weight.

For high school play, any ball used in play must have an official NFHS stamp to certify its size and weight. The ball is hollow inside and smooth on the outside. On game day, the umpire may choose a white or orange ball or another solid color depending upon lighting and field conditions. Whichever color is more likely to help the players and umpire see the ball most clearly is chosen.

Indoor field hockey is played on a smaller playing surface, and the ball is also generally smaller and lighter than the ball used for outdoor play. It is also hollow and smooth, making it best suited to indoor play.

The standard ball for elite level play is the Kookaburra ball. Its funny name comes from being a product of Australia, and over time it has become known by the nickname “kooks.” The ball has dimples on its surface, which helps it to roll true and predictably on wet surfaces. This makes it perfect for most natural turf conditions that you will play on during outdoor play. Another advantage of this ball is that it has a molded rubber and cork core, giving it a very soft touch for improved play.

Regardless of the conditions that you play and practice in, you need to be prepared to adapt your game and perform at your best. Having a selection of practice and official game balls available to you gives you this ability to adapt. You also need to make sure that the stick you choose is right for your game. No matter what your needs, visit Longstreth for field hockey equipment that you need to enjoy the game and play at your best.